A literary analysis of the imagery of blindness in oedipus rex by sophocles

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A literary analysis of the imagery of blindness in oedipus rex by sophocles

However, neither she nor her servant could bring themselves to kill him and he was abandoned to elements. There he was found and brought up by a shepherd, before being taken in and raised in the court of the childless King Polybus of Corinth as if he were his own son.

Stung by rumours that he was not the biological son of the king, Oedipus consulted an oracle which foretold that he would marry his own mother and kill his own father. Desperate to avoid this foretold fate, and believing Polybus and Merope to be his true parents, Oedipus left Corinth.

On the road to Thebes, he met Laius, his real father, and, unaware of each other's true identities, they quarrelled and Oedipus ' pride led him to murder Laius, fulfilling part of the oracle's prophecy. The prophecy was thus fulfilled, although none of the main characters were aware of it at this point.

A literary analysis of the imagery of blindness in oedipus rex by sophocles

As the play opens, a priest and the Chorus of Theban elders are calling on King Oedipus to aid them with the plague which has been sent by Apollo to ravage the city. Oedipus has already sent Creonhis brother-in-law, to consult the oracle at Delphi on the matter, and when Creon returns at that very moment, he reports that the plague will only end when the murderer of their former king, Laius, is caught and brought to justice.

Oedipus vows to find the murderer and curses him for the plague that he has caused.

A literary analysis of the imagery of blindness in oedipus rex by sophocles

Oedipus also summons the blind prophet Tiresiaswho claims to know the answers to Oedipus ' questions, but refuses to speak, lamenting his ability to see the truth when the truth brings nothing but pain. He advises Oedipus to abandon his search but, when the enraged Oedipus accuses Tiresias of complicity in the murder, Tiresias is provoked into telling the king the truth, that he himself is the murderer.

Oedipus dismisses this as nonsense, accusing the prophet of being corrupted by the ambitious Creon in an attempt to undermine him, and Tiresias leaves, putting forth one last riddle: Oedipus demands that Creon be executed, convinced that he is conspiring against him, and only the intervention of the Chorus persuades him to let Creon live.

Oedipus ' wife Jocasta tells him he should take no notice of prophets and oracles anyway because, many years ago, she and Laius received an oracle which never came true. This prophecy said that Laius would be killed by his own son but, as everyone knows, Laius was actually killed by bandits at a crossroads on the way to Delphi.

The mention of crossroads causes Oedipus to give pause and he suddenly becomes worried that Tiresias ' accusations may actually have been true.

SparkNotes: The Oedipus Plays: Themes

When a messenger from Corinth arrives with news of the death of King Polybus, Oedipus shocks everyone with his apparent happiness at the news, as he sees this as proof that he can never kill his father, although he still fears that he may somehow commit incest with his mother. The messenger, eager to ease Oedipus ' mind, tells him not to worry because Queen Merope of Corinth was not in fact his real mother anyway.

The messenger turns out to be the very shepherd who had looked after an abandoned child, which he later took to Corinth and gave up to King Polybus for adoption.

He is also the very same shepherd who witnessed the murder of Laius. By now, Jocasta is beginning to realize the truth, and desperately begs Oedipus to stop asking questions.

But Oedipus presses the shepherd, threatening him with torture or execution, until it finally emerges that the child he gave away was Laius' own son, and that Jocasta had given the baby to the shepherd to secretly be exposed upon the mountainside, in fear of the prophecy that Jocasta said had never come true: With all now finally revealed, Oedipus curses himself and his tragic destiny and stumbles off, as the Chorus laments how even a great man can be felled by fate.

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A servant enters and explains that Jocastawhen she had begun to suspect the truth, had ran to the palace bedroom and hanged herself there.

Oedipus enters, deliriously calling for a sword so that he might kill himself and raging through the house until he comes upon Jocasta 's body. In final despair, Oedipus takes two long gold pins from her dress, and plunges them into his own eyes.

Now blind, Oedipus begs to be exiled as soon as possible, and asks Creon to look after his two daughters, Antigone and Ismenelamenting that they should have been born into such a cursed family. Creon counsels that Oedipus should be kept in the palace until oracles can be consulted regarding what is best to be done, and the play ends as the Chorus wails: Analysis Back to Top of Page The play follows one chapter the most dramatic one in the life of OedipusKing of Thebes, who lived about a generation before the events of the Trojan War, namely his gradual realization that he has killed his own father, Laius, and committed incest with his own mother, Jocasta.

It assumes a certain amount of background knowledge of his story, which Greek audiences would have known well, although much of the background is also explained as the action unfolds.

Each of the incidents in the play is part of a tightly constructed cause-and-effect chain, assembled together as an investigation of the past, and the play is considered a marvel of plot structure.

Part of the tremendous sense of inevitability and fate in the play stems from the fact that all the irrational things have already occurred and are therefore unalterable.

Oedipus Rex

The main themes of the play are: Resources English translation by F. Storr Internet Classics Archive:A summary of Themes in Sophocles's The Oedipus Plays. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Oedipus Plays and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. “Oedipus the King” (Gr: “Oidipous Tyrannos”; Lat: “Oedipus Rex”) is a tragedy by the ancient Greek playwright Sophocles, first performed in about BCE.

It was the second of Sophocles ' three Theban plays to be produced, but it comes first in the internal chronology (followed by “Oedipus at Colonus” and then “Antigone”). Mar 28,  · Literary analysis of the phases a tragic hero character experiences in Oedipus Rex The King by Sophocles.

For this reason, Sophocles portrays Oedipus as a hunter, a plowman, and a sailor. Further analysis of "Oedipus the King" will explain how these three images symbolize human progression. Early in the play, Sophocles' introduces the image of Oedipus as a hunter.

Literary Devices in Oedipus the King - Owl Eyes

Nov 08,  · In Oedipus Rex the idea of destiny is the most important theme of the play. Oedipus, Jocasta and Laius all try to escape their destiny and take matters into their own hands.

Oedipus, Jocasta and Laius all try to escape their destiny and take matters into their own hands. The Deeper Meaning of Sight and Eyes in Sophocles' Oedipus The King Oedipus Rex: Imagery of Blindness and Sight as a Medium to the Themes Words | 5 Pages.

PEST Analysis (Political, Economic, Social & Technical Analysis) Capital Punishment Essay;.

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